Who Will Teach your Child to Read?

                         WHO WILL TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ?                                                       by Maryann Scheufele The possibility that confusion is introduced to some children through learning to read sounds exists within schools.  How to overcome this problem is not solved easily.  There is no proper or right or wrong way to speak a language within the borders of a country that gives freedom of speech to its citizens Pleased to Meet you Recently I was introduced to my friend’s three year old son:“Hi, what’s your name?” I asked“ADI”, he quietly replied.“What was that?” I asked as I bent closer to the little boy.“ADI”’ said the boy once more and his father repeated it upon seeing my puzzled look.I quickly took out a pen and paper as I decided to see if he would help me to write his name so that I could be sure that I understood what they were saying.I began writing, “Artie.”  We were in Boston and so I was thinking with my Boston accent.  The little boy watched as I asked, “Do you write your name like this?”He shook his head and said, “no.”His father saw what was happening and said, “ no, his name is ADI…ADI…that’s O…D…Y…ADI.”I put down my pen and stood up. “Oh, I laughed.  I was thinking with such a Boston accent.  Ody, what a nice name.  That’s cool.  Nice to meet you, Ody.”  I wondered if teachers made that sort of mistake.  I had new found respect for them.   My friend’s first language is English and his dialect is different than mine because he is from South Africa.  How his child learns to read and develop the ability to associate sounds with letters as in the phoneme recognition process could be a frustrating. There is a “code” to break in order to learn how to read, interpret, and understand the English Language.[1] For a child to grasp that code in their cognitive development, an alphabet sound becomes more than just the name of each letter, but the sound that it represents. My Personal Experience Teaching my Children to Read I have experienced the life-long benefits of developing a bond between myself and my children through reading.  Our vision towards life and learning was first experienced during our times together when they were very young.  From books, we were able to learn, dream, imagine, build vision towards our future, and accomplish an eagerness to learn more. Reading is an experience that allows a person to dream a dream, to create a vision, to experience a world beyond where they are.  Reading builds a vision far beyond what an illustration or an image in a photograph can illustrate because the human mind is far more complex than either of those perspectives. What the Specialists Think about Children Learning to Read Reading specialists acknowledge teaching children to read is a more structured and complex process than is recognized by most people.  As psychologists’, pediatricians’ and educators’ understanding that there are differences between children is illuminated with modern day research techniques, the reasons why some children focus on a mathematical problem and can finish a puzzle with the determination that is required to do so and other children can pay far better attention to every word told in a story no longer seems baffling.[2]  An inability to regulate ones activity and the lack of adequate memory are major symptoms of a learning disorder that is treatable through behavior intervention.[3]  These discoveries about how children learn alert us to take a more serious look at how our children are learning to read.The emphasis placed upon teaching children to read at a young age is concept that may be valuable beyond measure. Increasingly, there is persuasive evidence that stimulating the environment for learning can help to develop young children’s thinking and healthy brain development. This invites consideration to the vital importance of what types of things they are being exposed to. The development of children’s thinking capacity, as well as the future of our world, depend upon how much parents and educators consider the effects of their interactions with them and what are the environments that teach them.  Although all of the ages of children do deserve careful considerations, it is interesting to keep in mind the learning conditions of the young.  Once again, a quote from the American Academy of Pediatrics gives support to this priority: “Experience and stimulation shape our brains by creating patterns of thinking… The unique way in which each of us solves problems, interprets information, and responds to the environment follows the patterns established early with guidance from our primary care givers… And those patterns of thinking determine our social and emotional makeup as well as our intellectual growth… Dr Schor says-a discovery he points to as one of the most significant and exciting aspects of recent brain research… Just as we use certain patterns of thinking to decipher words on a page, we use certain patterns of thinking to interpret social circumstances and to regulate our emotions as well.”[4] Learning to Read May Help Develop Good Thinking Patterns in the Brain As interaction between language skills and learning to read are of significant value to the young child, so are the skills developed to produce good thinking patterns and may influence later successes in life.  The mechanics of repetition may be utilized in teaching reading skills to children of all ages. While some may argue that skill development gets boring when learning through basic drills and might actually stifle brain development, learning something basic and repeating the process is a key to accomplishment and works to develop successful patterns of thought in the brain.  For example the learning to read process which develops through repetitive drills can be likened to skiing on challenging mountainous terrain covered with freshly fallen snow.  The first time down the slope may be hazardous due to the difficulties in judging the speed and technique requirements.  With each consecutive run, the skier better manages the turns and anticipates the necessary skills to find more fulfillment of the challenge. Soon the trail has a clear path of packed down snow to follow.  Like with a pattern of thought as developed within the brain, the trail becomes the familiar pattern of thought and the skier may increase their speed and experience more joyful feelings of accomplishment with each run. Skiers often repeat runs down a trail until new challenges are discovered and more difficult trails are preferred.  It is the repetitive nature of learning the drills, and overcoming challenges that produce the feelings of accomplishment.  Like the skier, the child learning to read may enjoy the drills accompanied with repetition and accomplishment.  The procedure for successful learning combined with techniques providing positive responses can work to encourage repetitive success rates.  Producing children that are able to read from technique developing basic procedures follows the logic of enhancing brain development through environmental stimulus.   Stimulus producing chemical reactions are evidenced to physically occur through tracking the chemically stimulated responses which in turn emit synapse patterns. This visual representation of brain responses to chemical stimuli answers many questions about the environmental impact upon the brain, brain development, and learning.  As the environment produces physical responses and physical responses produce chemical responses which can be tracked in the brain by scientists, so then the chemical responses can be linked to physical activity induced by environmental conditions.  The elements of environmental, physical, and chemical then all become relative to the process of learning and healthy brain development.      The patterns developed through effective repetition will work to develop the child’s reading abilities and brain patterns for learning to read more.  Creating environments which provide conditions for healthy learning for children involves the acknowledgement of the dependence of brain development upon patterns of behavior and thinking associated with chemical, emotional and physical activities.  Introducing the elements for success into the environment of children can then be measured through interaction and assessment.  Patterns of behavior and thought which produce success are the result of environment and techniques.  The American Academy of Pediatrics Notes the Ability to Alter a Child’s Thinking Patterns The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends exposing children to stimulating learning environments and language models that offer sounds.  Interestingly, brain development in children begins after birth and progresses intensively in the beginning years.  The healthy child’s brain will develop according to the stimulus that it has been given, and the early years are critical to fulfilling brain development.  Although the specific timing of certain developmental progress of brain functions remains the subject of study, modern scientific research claims that environmental stimulus corresponds to brain chemistry. Along with understanding the importance of brain development, it is essential to educators and parents to realize that problems with development can be usually compensated for.  Intensive intervention given at the proper time will work to alter the brain.  Thinking patterns are a result of stimulus and reaction, and can be altered according to environmental controls to produce desired results.  In October of 2000 at Rockefeller University, Professors Paul Greengard, Arvid Carlsson and Eric Kandel earned a Nobel Prize in medicine by studying how “transmitters in the brain exert their action in the nervous system.”[5]  This study provided the foundation for understanding how the nervous system functions at the molecular level.  Neurochemical actions effect the transmission of nerve signals in the brain.  These scientists observed the communication between nerve cells.  As a result, biomedical research centers across the world are able to trace protein producing effects in the brain as they are related to certain learning disorders such as ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and substance abuse.  Neural pathways are configured within the child’s brain according to chemical interactions. Environments created to promote physical or chemically desired responses for healthy brain development, and to enhance the development of thought patterns for learning, are a product of advancement in our knowledge and understanding of the learning process. At present, scientists that study brain development acknowledge neural pathways that are configured within the child’s brain. Neural configurations may effect emotions, intellect, and the social development of the individual and occur according to their environmentally or physically derived chemical makeup. Evidence shows that combinations of synapses movement in the brain “determine the child’s ability to learn, relate to people, manage emotions, and function in the world.” [6]    It is interesting to note that the nervous system may be affected and similarly observed through reactions to environmentally stimulated chemical reactions within the brain. A correlation between the observations of environmental responses and chemical responses can be drawn.      Exercise science has shown the chemical effects of physical stimulus to the nervous system as chemicals are produced through physical activities. Neurochemistry is a study of how chemicals moving through the brain correlate with emotions.  The environmental factors associated with emotions also influence chemical results in the brain.  Response to both chemical and physical stimuli has motivated much research of the brain and the related nervous system.   For instance, parents can now visually observe their child’s brain functioning through brain-imaging technology, which is used to observe chemically treated children. Flow of blood through the brain, moved by oxygen, travels through certain synapses. Pediatricians know that very early stages of life may be responsible for brain development and the creation of patterns for thought process. In an article about early brain development, the AAP states: “The human brain is relatively undeveloped at birth- its potential waiting to unfold as its structure takes shape-and depends upon individual experience to guide its growth. Experiences, sensory inputs (visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and taste) organize patterns of communication between neurons.  These neural patterns become the determinants of how we think feel and behave.”[7]  What the pediatricians claim about childhood brain development combined with what the modern scientists from Rockefeller University have discovered through brain imaging processes leads to the notion that developing patterns of thought may work to help educate.  Learning to read may be likewise realized through the help of stimulating specific thought patterns. Why Parents are More Actively Involved With their Children Learning to Read Learning to read is one of the first great accomplishments that parents can celebrate as their children become communicators. For many families the task of teaching children to read requires a reading specialist’s diagnosis.  That your child learns how to read is of such importance, presidential candidates have given attention to the subject.  A relevant question ought to be posed by parents about who is teaching children to read.  At the same time teachers struggling to teach children might be informing concerned parents about who is the best teacher of children to read. Meanwhile, children learn to read sometimes and sometimes they do not.  Parents still wonder sometimes why their children are not learning to read in school and everyone is being encouraged to read more to their children in hopes that they will learn better how to read. Unfortunately, not everyone is in agreement about how children should learn how to read and who should be teaching them. Different methods to teach reading have been used and debated in the American school systems.  The effectiveness of each of them is always questionable because children lack the ability to read at startling rates. There are children with diverse thought patterns learning to read.  One way to establish the strength necessary to support this diversity when learning to read the English Language, whose destiny is eternal growth, is to broaden the foundation of the educating system.  Parents and grandparents are encouraged to read to children to help solve the problem of illiteracy.   Four things a parent can do to help their child learn to read: 1.  Recognize memorizing whole word methods of learning to read as a proceed with caution alert.  Children that have learned to memorize instead of read eventually start having problems learning. The cognitive experience of associating the sounds with the letters never happened for them.[8]  2.  Learn the phonemes.  Phonemes are the twenty-six sound representations of individual letters.  They can be analyzed to exist in all words when the letter symbols are taught in relation to those specific sounds.  A consistent relationship between each phoneme and letter all across a word exists…  The alphabet code is best learned with phonemes.  It is far simpler to teach children an awareness of what the individual letter symbols stand for in order to watch them learn to read and write with the English language spelling code.[9] 3.  Allow for your dialect to sound in phonemes. The earlier that a child learns phonemes, the easier it will be for them to learn how to read. Training to listen for the phonemes in speech is helpful to the child’s learning process.  Due to the idea that the awareness of phonemes can be recovered at any age, the earlier a child learns how to read through the phonemic method, the better.[10] 4.  Encourage young children to make sounds of their phonemes. The ability to naturally hear the phonemes in speech declines when a child reaches the point of mastering “his native tongue effortlessly and fluently."[11]A logical deduction can be made to support the differences in dialect that can be heard when the English language is spoken.  Necessary sound differences within the phoneme structure ought to be tolerated while vast varieties of tongues learn to speak and read it.   Teaching children to read is a basic part of the foundation to an education system. Limiting how children learn to read may produce more and more failure. As the landscape of people and cultures in the United States changes and grows, their system of education’s foundation needs to be strong enough to support that growth.   The educational system could be more open to look at new and innovative ways to strengthen the foundational skills of learning to read. How to Help your Child’s Cognitive Development While Learning to Read Within the learning process, there is a benefit achieved from recognizing the effects of stimuli, defining successful results, and repeating the process for further growth and development.  As the role of the interactive DVD is defined, assessment should produce results of effective learning to read techniques. The DVD provides a means by which repetitive monitoring of reading skills can be evaluated by the individual learning child. As interactive DVD techniques become familiar, reading skills are acquired, and mastered through repetition.   The interactive DVD can offer the brain of a child learning to read a work out.  The more they play it the better they learn.  How a story relates to a person is an important factor associated with learning how to read.  The child learning how to read needs to be motivated to do so from more than merely desiring to utter the sounds of the alphabet.  Their relationship with the words or a story helps the cognitive development.  The story understood brings the words on the page into the realm or understanding.  In a sense the story and the child understand each other while the act of learning to read takes place.  An important aspect of learning to read is developing an independent ability and promoting self esteem. The possibility of achieving cognitive recognition,  independent learning, and self esteem while learning to read exists through the interactive DVD.    Some Questions to ask the child learning to read with the interactive DVD:1.        Did you enjoy the story?2.        Would you like to read with Maryann when she reads the story?3.        Would you like to stop the pages and read slower with me?4.        Would you like to hear a different story?Maryann is Storyteller and Editor for Kidzebo DVD’s.        


[1].same as above

 

[2]Georgetown Magazine, Issued Fall 2003, Freiberg, Nancy, Mind Over Learning Matters.

 

[3]Georgetown Magazine, Issued Fall 2003, Freiberg, Nancy, Mind Over Learning Matters

[4] American Academy of Pediatrics, , Issued January 1999, Volume 3 Number 1, Healthy Child Care America  pg 7 

[5] The Rockefeller University, News and Publications, Issued October 9, 2000, Not Ready For Prime Time.

 

[6] Same as above

[7] American Academy of Pediatrics, , Issued January 1999, Volume 3 Number 1, Healthy Child Care America  pg 1 

[8] McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,

 

[9]  McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,  pg. 99-100 

[10]  McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,., p. 169

For the purpose of teaching the English language, each of the 26 letters of the alphabet represents a sound, along with, “27 consonant clusters that come at the beginning of syllables (bl, dw, str), and 49 consonant clusters that come at the end (nd, lk, nch, mpt).”[10]  Many more combinations of letters also represent other sounds.  Learning to read involves a building of sounds from their most intricate beginnings, even before they can be recognized as syllables or words.   

[11]. McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,   pg 164   

WHO WILL TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ?

                                   WHO WILL TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ?                                                       by Maryann Scheufele The possibility that confusion is introduced to some children through learning to read sounds exists within schools.  How to overcome this problem is not solved easily.  There is no proper or right or wrong way to speak a language within the borders of a country that gives freedom of speech to its citizens Pleased to Meet you Recently I was introduced to my friend’s three year old son:“Hi, what’s your name?” I asked“ADI”, he quietly replied.“What was that?” I asked as I bent closer to the little boy.“ADI”’ said the boy once more and his father repeated it upon seeing my puzzled look.I quickly took out a pen and paper as I decided to see if he would help me to write his name so that I could be sure that I understood what they were saying.I began writing, “Artie.”  We were in Boston and so I was thinking with my Boston accent.  The little boy watched as I asked, “Do you write your name like this?”He shook his head and said, “no.”His father saw what was happening and said, “ no, his name is ADI…ADI…that’s O…D…Y…ADI.”I put down my pen and stood up. “Oh, I laughed.  I was thinking with such a Boston accent.  Ody, what a nice name.  That’s cool.  Nice to meet you, Ody.”  I wondered if teachers made that sort of mistake.  I had new found respect for them.   My friend’s first language is English and his dialect is different than mine because he is from South Africa.  How his child learns to read and develop the ability to associate sounds with letters as in the phoneme recognition process could be a frustrating. There is a “code” to break in order to learn how to read, interpret, and understand the English Language.[1] For a child to grasp that code in their cognitive development, an alphabet sound becomes more than just the name of each letter, but the sound that it represents. My Personal Experience Teaching my Children to Read I have experienced the life-long benefits of developing a bond between myself and my children through reading.  Our vision towards life and learning was first experienced during our times together when they were very young.  From books, we were able to learn, dream, imagine, build vision towards our future, and accomplish an eagerness to learn more. Reading is an experience that allows a person to dream a dream, to create a vision, to experience a world beyond where they are.  Reading builds a vision far beyond what an illustration or an image in a photograph can illustrate because the human mind is far more complex than either of those perspectives. What the Specialists Think about Children Learning to Read Reading specialists acknowledge teaching children to read is a more structured and complex process than is recognized by most people.  As psychologists’, pediatricians’ and educators’ understanding that there are differences between children is illuminated with modern day research techniques, the reasons why some children focus on a mathematical problem and can finish a puzzle with the determination that is required to do so and other children can pay far better attention to every word told in a story no longer seems baffling.[2]  An inability to regulate ones activity and the lack of adequate memory are major symptoms of a learning disorder that is treatable through behavior intervention.[3]  These discoveries about how children learn alert us to take a more serious look at how our children are learning to read.The emphasis placed upon teaching children to read at a young age is concept that may be valuable beyond measure. Increasingly, there is persuasive evidence that stimulating the environment for learning can help to develop young children’s thinking and healthy brain development. This invites consideration to the vital importance of what types of things they are being exposed to. The development of children’s thinking capacity, as well as the future of our world, depend upon how much parents and educators consider the effects of their interactions with them and what are the environments that teach them.  Although all of the ages of children do deserve careful considerations, it is interesting to keep in mind the learning conditions of the young.  Once again, a quote from the American Academy of Pediatrics gives support to this priority: “Experience and stimulation shape our brains by creating patterns of thinking… The unique way in which each of us solves problems, interprets information, and responds to the environment follows the patterns established early with guidance from our primary care givers… And those patterns of thinking determine our social and emotional makeup as well as our intellectual growth… Dr Schor says-a discovery he points to as one of the most significant and exciting aspects of recent brain research… Just as we use certain patterns of thinking to decipher words on a page, we use certain patterns of thinking to interpret social circumstances and to regulate our emotions as well.”[4] Learning to Read May Help Develop Good Thinking Patterns in the Brain As interaction between language skills and learning to read are of significant value to the young child, so are the skills developed to produce good thinking patterns and may influence later successes in life.  The mechanics of repetition may be utilized in teaching reading skills to children of all ages. While some may argue that skill development gets boring when learning through basic drills and might actually stifle brain development, learning something basic and repeating the process is a key to accomplishment and works to develop successful patterns of thought in the brain.  For example the learning to read process which develops through repetitive drills can be likened to skiing on challenging mountainous terrain covered with freshly fallen snow.  The first time down the slope may be hazardous due to the difficulties in judging the speed and technique requirements.  With each consecutive run, the skier better manages the turns and anticipates the necessary skills to find more fulfillment of the challenge. Soon the trail has a clear path of packed down snow to follow.  Like with a pattern of thought as developed within the brain, the trail becomes the familiar pattern of thought and the skier may increase their speed and experience more joyful feelings of accomplishment with each run. Skiers often repeat runs down a trail until new challenges are discovered and more difficult trails are preferred.  It is the repetitive nature of learning the drills, and overcoming challenges that produce the feelings of accomplishment.  Like the skier, the child learning to read may enjoy the drills accompanied with repetition and accomplishment.  The procedure for successful learning combined with techniques providing positive responses can work to encourage repetitive success rates.  Producing children that are able to read from technique developing basic procedures follows the logic of enhancing brain development through environmental stimulus.   Stimulus producing chemical reactions are evidenced to physically occur through tracking the chemically stimulated responses which in turn emit synapse patterns. This visual representation of brain responses to chemical stimuli answers many questions about the environmental impact upon the brain, brain development, and learning.  As the environment produces physical responses and physical responses produce chemical responses which can be tracked in the brain by scientists, so then the chemical responses can be linked to physical activity induced by environmental conditions.  The elements of environmental, physical, and chemical then all become relative to the process of learning and healthy brain development.      The patterns developed through effective repetition will work to develop the child’s reading abilities and brain patterns for learning to read more.  Creating environments which provide conditions for healthy learning for children involves the acknowledgement of the dependence of brain development upon patterns of behavior and thinking associated with chemical, emotional and physical activities.  Introducing the elements for success into the environment of children can then be measured through interaction and assessment.  Patterns of behavior and thought which produce success are the result of environment and techniques.  The American Academy of Pediatrics Notes the Ability to Alter a Child’s Thinking Patterns The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends exposing children to stimulating learning environments and language models that offer sounds.  Interestingly, brain development in children begins after birth and progresses intensively in the beginning years.  The healthy child’s brain will develop according to the stimulus that it has been given, and the early years are critical to fulfilling brain development.  Although the specific timing of certain developmental progress of brain functions remains the subject of study, modern scientific research claims that environmental stimulus corresponds to brain chemistry. Along with understanding the importance of brain development, it is essential to educators and parents to realize that problems with development can be usually compensated for.  Intensive intervention given at the proper time will work to alter the brain.  Thinking patterns are a result of stimulus and reaction, and can be altered according to environmental controls to produce desired results.  In October of 2000 at Rockefeller University, Professors Paul Greengard, Arvid Carlsson and Eric Kandel earned a Nobel Prize in medicine by studying how “transmitters in the brain exert their action in the nervous system.”[5]  This study provided the foundation for understanding how the nervous system functions at the molecular level.  Neurochemical actions effect the transmission of nerve signals in the brain.  These scientists observed the communication between nerve cells.  As a result, biomedical research centers across the world are able to trace protein producing effects in the brain as they are related to certain learning disorders such as ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and substance abuse.  Neural pathways are configured within the child’s brain according to chemical interactions. Environments created to promote physical or chemically desired responses for healthy brain development, and to enhance the development of thought patterns for learning, are a product of advancement in our knowledge and understanding of the learning process. At present, scientists that study brain development acknowledge neural pathways that are configured within the child’s brain. Neural configurations may effect emotions, intellect, and the social development of the individual and occur according to their environmentally or physically derived chemical makeup. Evidence shows that combinations of synapses movement in the brain “determine the child’s ability to learn, relate to people, manage emotions, and function in the world.” [6]    It is interesting to note that the nervous system may be affected and similarly observed through reactions to environmentally stimulated chemical reactions within the brain. A correlation between the observations of environmental responses and chemical responses can be drawn.      Exercise science has shown the chemical effects of physical stimulus to the nervous system as chemicals are produced through physical activities. Neurochemistry is a study of how chemicals moving through the brain correlate with emotions.  The environmental factors associated with emotions also influence chemical results in the brain.  Response to both chemical and physical stimuli has motivated much research of the brain and the related nervous system.   For instance, parents can now visually observe their child’s brain functioning through brain-imaging technology, which is used to observe chemically treated children. Flow of blood through the brain, moved by oxygen, travels through certain synapses. Pediatricians know that very early stages of life may be responsible for brain development and the creation of patterns for thought process. In an article about early brain development, the AAP states: “The human brain is relatively undeveloped at birth- its potential waiting to unfold as its structure takes shape-and depends upon individual experience to guide its growth. Experiences, sensory inputs (visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and taste) organize patterns of communication between neurons.  These neural patterns become the determinants of how we think feel and behave.”[7]  What the pediatricians claim about childhood brain development combined with what the modern scientists from Rockefeller University have discovered through brain imaging processes leads to the notion that developing patterns of thought may work to help educate.  Learning to read may be likewise realized through the help of stimulating specific thought patterns. Why Parents are More Actively Involved With their Children Learning to Read Learning to read is one of the first great accomplishments that parents can celebrate as their children become communicators. For many families the task of teaching children to read requires a reading specialist’s diagnosis.  That your child learns how to read is of such importance, presidential candidates have given attention to the subject.  A relevant question ought to be posed by parents about who is teaching children to read.  At the same time teachers struggling to teach children might be informing concerned parents about who is the best teacher of children to read. Meanwhile, children learn to read sometimes and sometimes they do not.  Parents still wonder sometimes why their children are not learning to read in school and everyone is being encouraged to read more to their children in hopes that they will learn better how to read. Unfortunately, not everyone is in agreement about how children should learn how to read and who should be teaching them. Different methods to teach reading have been used and debated in the American school systems.  The effectiveness of each of them is always questionable because children lack the ability to read at startling rates. There are children with diverse thought patterns learning to read.  One way to establish the strength necessary to support this diversity when learning to read the English Language, whose destiny is eternal growth, is to broaden the foundation of the educating system.  Parents and grandparents are encouraged to read to children to help solve the problem of illiteracy.   Four things a parent can do to help their child learn to read: 1.  Recognize memorizing whole word methods of learning to read as a proceed with caution alert.  Children that have learned to memorize instead of read eventually start having problems learning. The cognitive experience of associating the sounds with the letters never happened for them.[8]  2.  Learn the phonemes.  Phonemes are the twenty-six sound representations of individual letters.  They can be analyzed to exist in all words when the letter symbols are taught in relation to those specific sounds.  A consistent relationship between each phoneme and letter all across a word exists…  The alphabet code is best learned with phonemes.  It is far simpler to teach children an awareness of what the individual letter symbols stand for in order to watch them learn to read and write with the English language spelling code.[9] 3.  Allow for your dialect to sound in phonemes. The earlier that a child learns phonemes, the easier it will be for them to learn how to read. Training to listen for the phonemes in speech is helpful to the child’s learning process.  Due to the idea that the awareness of phonemes can be recovered at any age, the earlier a child learns how to read through the phonemic method, the better.[10] 4.  Encourage young children to make sounds of their phonemes. The ability to naturally hear the phonemes in speech declines when a child reaches the point of mastering “his native tongue effortlessly and fluently."[11]A logical deduction can be made to support the differences in dialect that can be heard when the English language is spoken.  Necessary sound differences within the phoneme structure ought to be tolerated while vast varieties of tongues learn to speak and read it.   Teaching children to read is a basic part of the foundation to an education system. Limiting how children learn to read may produce more and more failure. As the landscape of people and cultures in the United States changes and grows, their system of education’s foundation needs to be strong enough to support that growth.   The educational system could be more open to look at new and innovative ways to strengthen the foundational skills of learning to read. How to Help your Child’s Cognitive Development While Learning to Read Within the learning process, there is a benefit achieved from recognizing the effects of stimuli, defining successful results, and repeating the process for further growth and development.  As the role of the interactive DVD is defined, assessment should produce results of effective learning to read techniques. The DVD provides a means by which repetitive monitoring of reading skills can be evaluated by the individual learning child. As interactive DVD techniques become familiar, reading skills are acquired, and mastered through repetition.   The interactive DVD can offer the brain of a child learning to read a work out.  The more they play it the better they learn.  How a story relates to a person is an important factor associated with learning how to read.  The child learning how to read needs to be motivated to do so from more than merely desiring to utter the sounds of the alphabet.  Their relationship with the words or a story helps the cognitive development.  The story understood brings the words on the page into the realm or understanding.  In a sense the story and the child understand each other while the act of learning to read takes place.  An important aspect of learning to read is developing an independent ability and promoting self esteem. The possibility of achieving cognitive recognition,  independent learning, and self esteem while learning to read exists through the interactive DVD.    Some Questions to ask the child learning to read with the interactive DVD:1.        Did you enjoy the story?2.        Would you like to read with Maryann when she reads the story?3.        Would you like to stop the pages and read slower with me?4.        Would you like to hear a different story?Maryann is Storyteller and Editor for Kidzebo DVD’s.        


[1].same as above

 

[2]Georgetown Magazine, Issued Fall 2003, Freiberg, Nancy, Mind Over Learning Matters.

 

[3]Georgetown Magazine, Issued Fall 2003, Freiberg, Nancy, Mind Over Learning Matters

[4] American Academy of Pediatrics, , Issued January 1999, Volume 3 Number 1, Healthy Child Care America  pg 7 

[5] The Rockefeller University, News and Publications, Issued October 9, 2000, Not Ready For Prime Time.

 

[6] Same as above

[7] American Academy of Pediatrics, , Issued January 1999, Volume 3 Number 1, Healthy Child Care America  pg 1 

[8] McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,

 

[9]  McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,  pg. 99-100 

[10]  McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,., p. 169

For the purpose of teaching the English language, each of the 26 letters of the alphabet represents a sound, along with, “27 consonant clusters that come at the beginning of syllables (bl, dw, str), and 49 consonant clusters that come at the end (nd, lk, nch, mpt).”[10]  Many more combinations of letters also represent other sounds.  Learning to read involves a building of sounds from their most intricate beginnings, even before they can be recognized as syllables or words.   

[11]. McGuinness, Diane Ph.D., Why Our Children Can’t Read And What We Can Do About It. c1997 by Diane Mcguinness, Simon and Shuster Touchstone Book, N.Y.,N.Y.,   pg 164